Relaciones Internacionales – Comunicación Internacional

4 diciembre, 2022
por Felipe Sahagún
0 Comentarios

China’s protests, war in Ukraine, Elon Musk, COP27… (Listening Post)

Protests in China: The blank sheets tell a tale

Protesters in China brave a surveillance state as they push back against stifling zero-COVID policies. Plus, art in times of turmoil in Sri Lanka. Dec 3, 2022

Russia-Ukraine: Navigating the media minefield

Can Twitter survive Elon Musk?

Do climate summits achieve anything?

The Right Frequency: Is talk radio dividing America?

Inside the Wagner Group, Russia’s mercenary force

 

 

4 diciembre, 2022
por Felipe Sahagún
0 Comentarios

Chinese journalists-spies in Brussels

 
 
politico.eu
The EU has a spy problem — here’s why it’s so difficult to catch them
Faced with Russian hostility and Chinese snooping, Belgium has upped its counterintelligence game — but Brussels remains a spies’ playground.
Felipe Sahagún@sahagunfelipe
Los servicios secretos belgas sospechan que uno de cada cinco periodistas chinos acreditados en Bruselas son espías –@POLITICOEuropepolitico.eu/article/eu-spy@jpmarthoz
 
 

4 diciembre, 2022
por Felipe Sahagún
0 Comentarios

How did journalists cover the last pandemia?

Two years of journalists scrambling to make sense of an ever-changing pandemic

by Jon Allsop

Editor’s Note

Two and a half years on, COVID continues to ravage. Older Americans continue to die from the virus at rates not seen since the earliest days of the pandemic, and much of the globe remains scandalously unvaccinated.

The pandemic has remade every part of our world, and the press is not exempt. Continuar leyendo →

4 diciembre, 2022
por Felipe Sahagún
0 Comentarios

Covering Iran`s unrest (THE WASHINGTON POST)

As the government tightens its grip on the press and protesters, journalists rely on distant contacts and navigate misinformation to tell the story

For more than two months, journalist Golnaz Esfandiari has been reporting nonstop on the protests and brutal crackdowns erupting across Iran — from more than 2,500 miles away in Prague.

It’s not easy. With foreign press virtually absent inside Iran — where authorities are arresting local journalists, restricting internet access and allegedly spreading misinformation online — distant correspondents such as Esfandiari face a deluge of challenges in getting accurate news about Iran to the rest of the world.

So she and her colleagues at Persian-language Radio Farda use secure messaging apps to communicate with their network of sources inside Iran, who could be jailed for speaking to the media. They spend hours analyzing videos from Iran to verify their authenticity. And they interview the families of protesters who have been killed.

Continuar leyendo →