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Mass shootings and the Washington Navy Yard attack: U.S. data

Reports from the Congressional Research Service and other sources provide insight into mass shootings, their perpetrators and the range of motives.

State health care exchanges and Obamacare: Research on key questions

With 2014 and the debut of the Affordable Care Act just around the corner, confusion continues to surround the new law. We round up relevant studies to provide insight.

Syria, chemical weapons and the «responsibility to protect»

As the U.S. and Russia continue to negotiate over the Syrian crisis, what does the research say about earlier cases of armed intervention for humanitarian reasons?

U.S. transportation safety over time: Cars, planes, trains, walking, cycling

While most forms of travel have become safer, there are still significant differences between their fatality rates. A new study breaks down the numbers.

 
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Do new prosecution strategies reduce crime and incarceration rates?

A study in American Law and Economics Review looks at Chicago’s experience with more closely connecting prosecution efforts with citizens’ concerns.

What’s new in digital media research: Apps, ads and open-source journalism

As part of our ongoing collaboration with Nieman Journalism Lab, we round up the latest studies in journalism research, political science, communications and more.

Even in corporate wrongdoing, women face a gender gap

A new study in American Sociological Review indicates that when it comes to white-collar crime, women tend to gain less and are more likely be used by co-conspirators.

The psychology of risk assessment in economic markets

Research in PNAS sheds light on «partition dependence» in our judgment of probability — how the grouping of possible outcomes can alter their perceived riskiness.

Riptide: The epic collision between digital techology and journalism

Three journalism and media veterans — John Huey, Martin Nisenholtz and Paul Sagan — trace the evolution of digital news from early experiments to today.

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The Arab Spring and the Internet: Research roundup

Roundup of recent studies that bring a scholarly, data-driven lens to questions around the Arab Spring.

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/international/africa#sthash.WEblpNaq.dpuf

Claims about the Internet’s impact on the political upheaval in the Middle East and North Africa abound in popular discourse and news reports. As is well known, there is a fierce and unresolved debate about what role social and digital media played in catalyzing and sustaining the events of the “Arab Spring,” or uprising. Many of the questions will, of course, only be sufficiently answered as the national political consequences become fully apparent in various countries. And two years after the January 25th uprising in Tahrir Square, much still hangs in the balance. – See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/international/global-tech/research-arab-spring-internet-key-studies#sthash.RKcEJ2ro.dpuf

Claims about the Internet’s impact on the political upheaval in the Middle East and North Africa abound in popular discourse and news reports. As is well known, there is a fierce and unresolved debate about what role social and digital media played in catalyzing and sustaining the events of the “Arab Spring,” or uprising. Many of the questions will, of course, only be sufficiently answered as the national political consequences become fully apparent in various countries. And two years after the January 25th uprising in Tahrir Square, much still hangs in the balance.

A 2012 report from the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project, “Social Networking Popular Across Globe: Arab Publics Most Likely to Express Political Views Online,” notes that the region currently has some distinctive online dynamics: ““In Egypt and Tunisia, two nations at the heart of the Arab Spring, more than six-in-ten social networkers share their views about politics online. In contrast, across 20 of the nations surveyed, a median of only 34% post their political opinions. Similarly, in Egypt, Tunisia, Lebanon and Jordan, more than seven-in-ten share views on community issues, compared with a cross-national median of just 46%.”

For further comparative perspective on Asia and Africa, see a 2012 study from Ohio State University and the University of Washington published in the Journal of Communication, “Internet Use and Democratic Demands: A Multinational, Multilevel Model of Internet Use and Citizen Attitudes about Democracy.”

For those wanting to understand how the Western press interacted with and amplified certain dynamics, this paper offers interesting perspective: “Sourcing the Arab Spring: A Case Study of Andy Carvin’s Sources During the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions” (PDF).

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/international/global-tech/research-arab-spring-internet-key-studies#sthash.RKcEJ2ro.dpuf

Claims about the Internet’s impact on the political upheaval in the Middle East and North Africa abound in popular discourse and news reports. As is well known, there is a fierce and unresolved debate about what role social and digital media played in catalyzing and sustaining the events of the “Arab Spring,” or uprising. Many of the questions will, of course, only be sufficiently answered as the national political consequences become fully apparent in various countries. And two years after the January 25th uprising in Tahrir Square, much still hangs in the balance.

A 2012 report from the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project, “Social Networking Popular Across Globe: Arab Publics Most Likely to Express Political Views Online,” notes that the region currently has some distinctive online dynamics: ““In Egypt and Tunisia, two nations at the heart of the Arab Spring, more than six-in-ten social networkers share their views about politics online. In contrast, across 20 of the nations surveyed, a median of only 34% post their political opinions. Similarly, in Egypt, Tunisia, Lebanon and Jordan, more than seven-in-ten share views on community issues, compared with a cross-national median of just 46%.”

For further comparative perspective on Asia and Africa, see a 2012 study from Ohio State University and the University of Washington published in the Journal of Communication, “Internet Use and Democratic Demands: A Multinational, Multilevel Model of Internet Use and Citizen Attitudes about Democracy.”

For those wanting to understand how the Western press interacted with and amplified certain dynamics, this paper offers interesting perspective: “Sourcing the Arab Spring: A Case Study of Andy Carvin’s Sources During the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions” (PDF).

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/international/global-tech/research-arab-spring-internet-key-studies#sthash.RKcEJ2ro.dpuf

Claims about the Internet’s impact on the political upheaval in the Middle East and North Africa abound in popular discourse and news reports. As is well known, there is a fierce and unresolved debate about what role social and digital media played in catalyzing and sustaining the events of the “Arab Spring,” or uprising. Many of the questions will, of course, only be sufficiently answered as the national political consequences become fully apparent in various countries. And two years after the January 25th uprising in Tahrir Square, much still hangs in the balance.

A 2012 report from the Pew Research Center’s Global Attitudes Project, “Social Networking Popular Across Globe: Arab Publics Most Likely to Express Political Views Online,” notes that the region currently has some distinctive online dynamics: ““In Egypt and Tunisia, two nations at the heart of the Arab Spring, more than six-in-ten social networkers share their views about politics online. In contrast, across 20 of the nations surveyed, a median of only 34% post their political opinions. Similarly, in Egypt, Tunisia, Lebanon and Jordan, more than seven-in-ten share views on community issues, compared with a cross-national median of just 46%.”

For further comparative perspective on Asia and Africa, see a 2012 study from Ohio State University and the University of Washington published in the Journal of Communication, “Internet Use and Democratic Demands: A Multinational, Multilevel Model of Internet Use and Citizen Attitudes about Democracy.”

For those wanting to understand how the Western press interacted with and amplified certain dynamics, this paper offers interesting perspective: “Sourcing the Arab Spring: A Case Study of Andy Carvin’s Sources During the Tunisian and Egyptian Revolutions” (PDF).

– See more at: http://journalistsresource.org/studies/international/global-tech/research-arab-spring-internet-key-studies#sthash.RKcEJ2ro.dpuf

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